Digestive System Home > Lactose Intolerance Treatment

In many cases, lactose intolerance treatment is fairly simple -- it involves the patient changing his or her diet. Some other forms of lactose intolerance treatment include drinking lactose-reduced milk and taking lactase enzyme tablets.

An Introduction to Lactose Intolerance Treatment

Lactose intolerance is generally fairly easy to treat. For most people, lactose intolerance treatment involves modifying their diet. While no treatment can improve the body's ability to produce lactase, a person can usually effectively control his or her lactose intolerance symptoms.
 

Lactose Intolerance Treatment for Infants and Young Children

Young children and infants with lactase deficiency should not consume lactose-containing formulas or foods until they are able to digest lactose.
 

Lactose Intolerance Treatment for Older Children and Adults

Most older children and adults do not have to avoid lactose completely, but people differ in the amounts and types of foods they can handle. For example, one person may have symptoms of lactose intolerance after drinking a small glass of milk, while another can drink one glass but not two. Others may be able to manage ice cream and aged cheeses, such as cheddar and Swiss, but not other dairy products. People can also tolerate more lactose by having smaller amounts of it at one time. The level of dietary control needed for lactose intolerance treatment depends on how much lactose a person's body can handle.
 

Lactose Intolerance Treatment: Lactase Supplement

For those who react to very small amounts of lactose or have trouble limiting their intake of foods that contain it, the lactase enzyme is available without a prescription to help people digest foods that contain lactose. These tablets are taken with the first bite of dairy-containing food. The lactase enzyme is also available as a liquid. Adding a few drops of the enzyme makes lactose more digestible for people with lactose intolerance.
 
Written by/reviewed by:
Last reviewed by: Arthur Schoenstadt, MD
Last updated/reviewed:
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