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Ranitidine - Symptoms of IBS

This page contains links to eMedTV Digestive System Articles containing information on subjects from Ranitidine to Symptoms of IBS. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Ranitidine
    Ranitidine is a drug that may be used to treat heartburn, ulcers, GERD, and other conditions. This eMedTV Web page covers both over-the-counter and prescription forms of ranitidine, including details about how they reduce acid in the stomach.
  • Ranitidine Dosing
    Ranitidine dosing guidelines for the treatment of GERD generally call for a 150 mg dose taken twice daily. This eMedTV page discusses the recommended ranitidine dosages for treating ulcers, erosive esophagitis, and other conditions.
  • Ranitidine HCl
    If you have heartburn or acid indigestion, you may benefit from ranitidine HCl. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at this drug, with information on how often it is taken and what else it can be used for. A link to more details is also included.
  • Ranitidine Side Affects
    Ranitidine side effects can include headache, upset stomach, and diarrhea. This eMedTV page identifies some side effects of ranitidine and offers a link to more information. Ranitidine side affects is a common misspelling of ranitidine side effects.
  • Ranitidine Side Effects
    Common side effects of ranitidine include upset stomach, headache, and diarrhea. This eMedTV segment discusses the side effects of this medicine, including information about rare but serious health problems that may occur with the medication.
  • Rantadine
    This eMedTV resource offers a brief overview of ranitidine, a medication used to treat conditions such as ulcers and heartburn. This page lists other uses and explains what to do before taking the drug. Rantadine is a common misspelling of ranitidine.
  • Rantidine
    This eMedTV page offers an overview of ranitidine, a medication used to treat conditions such as heartburn, indigestion, and ulcers. This page also describes some general precautions with the drug. Rantidine is a common misspelling of ranitidine.
  • Reacciones Alérgicas a los Medicamentos
    Reacciones Alérgicas a los Medicamentos
  • Reasons an Upper Endoscopy Is Recommended
    This video clip explains what is involved in an EGD.
  • Reasons for an ERCP
    This video clip explains when a doctor may recommend an ERCP.
  • Rechazo del Transplante - Análisis Detallado
    Rechazo del Transplante - Análisis Detallado
  • Rechazo del Transplante - Generalidades
    Rechazo del Transplante - Generalidades
  • Rectal Bleed
    As this eMedTV segment explains, rectal bleeds are most often caused by hemorrhoids. However, they have many other potential causes. This article gives an overview of rectal bleeding and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Rectal Bleeding
    Rectal bleeding can be a symptom of various diseases, from hemorrhoids to cancer. This page from the eMedTV archives explains the types of bleeding that can occur, possible causes, treatment options, and diagnostic procedures.
  • Rectal Bleeding Causes
    This eMedTV Web page provides an in-depth look at typical rectal bleeding causes. They can range from serious conditions, such as infections and cancer, to less serious ones, such as hemorrhoids and anal fissures.
  • Rectiv
    Your healthcare provider may recommend Rectiv if you have pain caused by chronic anal fissures. This eMedTV article offers an overview of this medicated ointment, with details on how to use it, what to expect, drug warnings, and more.
  • Rectiv and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if Rectiv (nitroglycerin anal ointment) passes through breast milk. This eMedTV Web selection explains how very little research has been done on the possible risks of breastfeeding while using Rectiv and why problems are unlikely.
  • Rectiv and Pregnancy
    If you are pregnant, talk to your healthcare provider before using Rectiv (nitroglycerin anal ointment). This eMedTV resource talks about the safety of using this ointment during pregnancy, including why the FDA considers it a Category C drug.
  • Rectiv Dosage
    When using Rectiv, the standard dosage is to apply the ointment twice a day for up to three weeks. This eMedTV Web article explains the dosing guidelines for this product, including helpful tips on how to apply it.
  • Rectiv Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV Web page lists several drugs that can interact with Rectiv, including amlodipine, atenolol, and tadalafil. This article also explains what problems can occur as a result and explains how to reduce your risk for complications.
  • Rectiv Medication Information
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV site, Rectiv is a prescription ointment used to treat pain caused by anal fissures. This article offers some basic information on Rectiv, including a link to more details on the medication.
  • Rectiv Overdose
    Using too much Rectiv (nitroglycerin anal ointment) could cause seizures, a severe headache, or even death. This eMedTV Web page talks about what you can expect from an overdose with this product, including potential treatment options.
  • Rectiv Side Effects
    This eMedTV segment explains that the most often reported Rectiv side effect is a headache. This Web selection talks in detail about the potential side effects of this anal ointment, including serious problems that require immediate medical care.
  • Rectiv Uses
    Rectiv is approved to treat pain caused by chronic anal fissures. This part of the eMedTV site takes a closer look at why your healthcare provider may recommend the use of Rectiv, including information on how it works and whether children can use it.
  • Rectiv Warnings and Precautions
    In some cases, Rectiv can cause dangerously low blood pressure. This eMedTV article talks about the warnings and precautions associated with this ointment, explaining who should avoid Rectiv altogether.
  • Recursos Adicionales
    Recursos Adicionales
  • Recursos Útiles
    Recursos Útiles
  • Resultados Esperados Para el Receptor
    Resultados Esperados Para el Receptor
  • Resumen
    Resumen
  • Resumen
    Resumen
  • Resumen -- Donación
    Resumen -- Donación
  • Riesgos Para el Receptor
    Riesgos Para el Receptor
  • Risks as a Diabetic (ERCP With Sphincterotomy)
    This video clip explains some of the health risks associated with diabetes.
  • Risks of Colonoscopy
    As with any medical procedure, a colonoscopy does carry certain risks. This segment of the eMedTV library discusses both minor and major problems that may occur and describes those who may be at greater risk.
  • Risks to the Liver Recipient
    This video describes the possible risks the recipient faces before and after surgery.
  • Risks With Adult Living Donor Liver Transplant
    Risks with adult living donor liver transplant include minor bleeding, allergic reaction, and nausea. This eMedTV Web page lists other risks and major complications that can occur, such as infection, hernia, and bile duct leaks.
  • RM
    Su médico puede obtener más información acerca de su estado por medio de una prueba indolora llamada RM, que significa "resonancia magnética".
  • RotaTeq
    RotaTeq is a routine vaccine used to prevent rotavirus (a virus that causes severe diarrhea). This eMedTV page covers the benefits of the product, explains when your child should get vaccinated, and lists possible side effects of the vaccine.
  • RotaTeq Dosage
    RotaTeq is given as a series of three doses, each given 4 to 10 weeks apart (2 mL per dosage). This eMedTV resource offers more detailed dosing guidelines for RotaTeq and provides general warnings on what to be aware of before your child gets vaccinated.
  • RotaTeq Drug Interactions
    Immune globulins and immunosuppressants may cause drug interactions with RotaTeq. This part of the eMedTV site lists different types of immunosuppressants that can interfere with RotaTeq and describes the potential effects of these drug interactions.
  • RotaTeq Side Effects
    Common side effects of RotaTeq include sore throat, runny nose, diarrhea, ear infection, and vomiting. This eMedTV resource also lists some of the rare but potentially serious side effects that should be reported to your doctor immediately.
  • RotaTeq Uses
    Infants are often given RotaTeq, a vaccine used to prevent rotavirus. This article from the eMedTV Web site further explores the approved uses for RotaTeq, explains what rotavirus is, and describes how the live vaccine works.
  • RotaTeq Vaccine Information
    RotaTeq is used to prevent rotavirus, a virus that causes severe diarrhea in infants and young children. This eMedTV article offers more details on the childhood vaccine, including information on how RotaTeq works and when it is typically given.
  • RotaTeq Warnings and Precautions
    RotaTeq may not be safe or effective for children with digestive illnesses. This eMedTV page further explores the safety and effectiveness of this vaccine. Warnings and precautions on what side effects may occur with RotaTeq are also listed here.
  • Rototec
    RotaTeq is a childhood vaccine used to prevent rotavirus, a virus that causes severe diarrhea. This eMedTV page explains how and when to get RotaTeq and lists some possible side effects of the vaccine. Rototec is a common misspelling of RotaTeq.
  • Sangrado y Daño en los Vasos Sanguíneos
    Sangrado y Daño en los Vasos Sanguíneos
  • Scar Formation and Liver Donation Surgery
    An inevitable consequence of any surgery is scar formation, and liver donation surgery is no exception. As this eMedTV page explains, while scars are normal after surgery, thicker scar formations, called keloids, can be tender or painful for a while.
  • Secondary Biliary Cirrhosis
    Secondary biliary cirrhosis occurs when the large bile ducts outside of the liver become blocked. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at secondary biliary cirrhosis causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment -- and also links to more information.
  • Senna
    Senna is a natural product often used as a laxative for the treatment of constipation. This article from the eMedTV Web site further explains what the product is used for, describes how it works, and lists some of its common side effects.
  • Senna and Breastfeeding
    It is generally considered to be safe to use senna (short-term) if you are nursing. This page on the eMedTV site provides more information about breastfeeding and senna, and explains whether this product is likely to pass through breast milk.
  • Senna and Pregnancy
    Short-term use of senna is generally considered to be safe during pregnancy. This eMedTV article offers a more in-depth look at pregnancy and senna, and explains whether birth defects or other problems have been reported with this product.
  • Senna Benefits
    Senna is often used for treating constipation and for preparing the bowels for a colonoscopy. This page from the eMedTV library also lists some of its other claimed benefits and discusses the use of this botanical product in young children.
  • Senna Dosage
    The usual dosage of senna for constipation in people over age 12 is 15 mg sennosides once daily. This eMedTV page also offers dosage guidelines for children and explains how dosing works if the product is used as part of bowel prep for a colonoscopy.
  • Senna Drug Interactions
    Warfarin, digoxin, and certain diuretics may cause drug interactions with senna. This section of the eMedTV archives lists specific products from these drug classes and explains what may happen if these medications are taken in combination with senna.
  • Senna Information
    Senna is a botanical product commonly used as a laxative for the treatment of constipation. This eMedTV resource contains more information on senna, including how the product works and important warnings and precautions for the medication.
  • Senna Overdose
    As this eMedTV segment explains, an overdose of senna is likely to cause a strong laxative effect, possibly leading to diarrhea and bloating. This page lists other possible effects of an overdose and explains what steps may be taken to treat it.
  • Senna Side Effects
    Nausea, gas, and bloating are some of the most commonly reported side effects of senna. This eMedTV resource lists other common side effects of the product and also explains which problems are potentially serious and require immediate medical attention.
  • Serosis
    Cirrhosis is a liver condition that occurs when scar tissue replaces healthy, normal liver tissue. This eMedTV Web page provides a brief overview of this condition and a link to more information. Serosis is a common misspelling of cirrhosis.
  • Señales de Complicaciones Quirúrgicas
    Señales de Complicaciones Quirúrgicas
  • Short Bowel Syndrome
    Short bowel syndrome is a condition characterized by diarrhea, cramping, and heartburn. As this eMedTV article explains, it can occur in people who have had half or more of their small intestine removed. This page discusses the syndrome in detail.
  • Short-Term Emotional and Mental Effects (Liver Donation Surgery)
    This video explains what kind of short-term emotional and mental effects to expect.
  • Short-Term Emotional and Mental Effects Following Liver Donation Surgery
    This eMedTV article explains how donation surgery can cause short-term emotional and mental effects. Following liver donation surgery, some donors may feel anxiety from drugs, guilty if the recipient has problems, or unhappy about the resulting scar.
  • Side Effects of Balsalazide
    Side effects of balsalazide are usually minor and easily treated. This page on the eMedTV site lists common side effects seen with the drug (such as joint pain or cramps), as well as serious side effects requiring immediate medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Budesonide EC
    Headaches and respiratory infections are among the most commonly reported side effects of budesonide EC. This eMedTV article outlines common and rare side effects of budesonide EC, as well as the side effects that may require prompt medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Carafate
    The most commonly reported side effect of Carafate is constipation. This page from the eMedTV Web site offers a detailed list of other potential side effects seen with this drug and explains which reactions may require prompt medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Dicyclomine
    Dizziness, blurred vision, and dry mouth are the most common side effects of dicyclomine. This eMedTV article describes other possible dicyclomine side effects and includes a list of potentially serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Ethacrynic Acid
    Fatigue, blurred vision, and loss of appetite are possible side effects of ethacrynic acid. This eMedTV segment lists other possible side effects seen with the drug and describes serious problems that should be reported to a physician right away.
  • Side Effects of Lubiprostone
    Some of the most common side effects of lubiprostone include nausea, headaches, and diarrhea. This eMedTV segment highlights other common lubiprostone side effects and also describes which ones are serious and require immediate medical care.
  • Side Effects of Misoprostol
    Diarrhea and nausea are among the most commonly reported misoprostol side effects. This page from the eMedTV Web site contains a list of possible reactions that this drug may cause for some people, including common and potentially serious problems.
  • Side Effects of Olsalazine
    Side effects of olsalazine, such as diarrhea or headaches, are usually easily treated. But as this eMedTV page explains, some side effects (such as signs of liver damage) are potentially serious and should be reported right away to your doctor.
  • Side Effects of Ondansetron Oral Soluble Film
    Some of the most common side effects of ondansetron oral soluble film include headaches and constipation. This eMedTV article further explores the side effects of this drug, including statistics on how often they occur and when to contact your doctor.
  • Side Effects of Orally Disintegrating Metoclopramide
    Depression and high fever are potentially dangerous side effects of orally disintegrating metoclopramide. This eMedTV article explains that most people have no problems with this drug, but does list other rare and common side effects to watch out for.
  • Side Effects of Tegaserod
    Among the side effects of tegaserod listed on this eMedTV page are common side effects like headache and nausea; side effects to report to your doctor, such as bloody diarrhea or rectal bleeding; and rare side effects like hair loss and depression.
  • Side Effects of Triamterene-HCTZ
    If side effects of triamterene-HCTZ occur, they can include drowsiness, vomiting, and headaches. This eMedTV article lists other side effects that have been reported with the drug, including those that may require prompt medical attention.
  • Side Effects of TriLyte
    Bloating, nausea, and a feeling of abdominal fullness may occur while you are taking TriLyte. This part of the eMedTV site takes a quick look at TriLyte's side effects, including a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • Sigmoidoscopy
    A sigmoidoscopy allows a doctor to see the last third of the colon and rectum. This eMedTV page further explains the procedure, including what to expect, how it is performed, and how it differs from a colonoscopy.
  • Sigmoidoscopy
    This video clip explains what will happen during a flexible sigmoidoscopy.
  • Sigmoidscopie
    A sigmoidoscopy is a procedure that involves examining the last third of the colon and rectum. This eMedTV page further describes how this procedure can help screen for cancer or other problems. Sigmoidscopie is a common misspelling of sigmoidoscopy.
  • Sigmoidscopy
    As this eMedTV page explains, a sigmoidoscopy is a procedure that allows a doctor to look for problems in the last third of the colon and rectum. This page also covers possible risks of the procedure. Sigmoidscopy is a common misspelling of sigmoidoscopy.
  • Signs and Symptoms of Appendicitis
    As this eMedTV article explains, common signs and symptoms of appendicitis include abdominal pain (especially in the lower-right area), nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite. A link to more in-depth information on the condition is also provided.
  • Signs of Appendicitis
    Low-grade fever, abdominal pain, and vomiting are common signs of appendicitis. This eMedTV resource provides detailed information on the symptoms of this condition in different people, such as children, pregnant women, and the elderly.
  • Sinitinib
    Available by prescription only, sunitinib is a medication used to treat certain types of cancer. This eMedTV page gives a brief overview of this chemotherapy drug and provides a link to more information. Sinitinib is a common misspelling of sunitinib.
  • Smoking and Heartburn
    If you smoke, you are at risk for heartburn. This part of the eMedTV archives explains how smoking can lead to heartburn and make symptoms worse in people who already have it. This page also provides basic information about smoking and heartburn.
  • Spastic Colon
    Spastic colon is a disorder that often results in diarrhea, constipation, and abdominal cramping. This eMedTV Web page offers an overview of this condition, including how it is diagnosed and other symptoms that may occur.
  • Sunitinib
    As this eMedTV page explains, sunitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor used to treat certain types of kidney, pancreatic, and gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. This resource takes a closer look at this drug, including effectiveness, how to take it, and more.
  • Symptoms of Apendicitis
    This eMedTV page describes possible symptoms of appendicitis, such as abdominal pain, loss of appetite, nausea, and vomiting. However, the condition can be hard to diagnose. Symptoms of apendicitis is a common misspelling of symptoms of appendicitis.
  • Symptoms of Appendicitis
    Abdominal pain, loss of appetite, and vomiting are common symptoms of appendicitis. This page on the eMedTV Web site features a list of common appendicitis symptoms and includes a link to more in-depth information on the subject.
  • Symptoms of Barrett's Esophagus
    There are no symptoms of Barrett's esophagus, but in some cases, the condition can lead to cancer. This eMedTV segment discusses the likelihood of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma as a result of Barrett's esophagus.
  • Symptoms of Colon Polyps
    Common symptoms of colon polyps include anal bleeding, blood in the stool, and constipation or diarrhea. As this eMedTV resource points out, however, many people with the condition experience no signs or symptoms of colon polyps.
  • Symptoms of Hemochromatosis
    Fatigue, abdominal pain, and heart problems are some of the possible symptoms of hemochromatosis. This eMedTV page discusses conditions that are possible indicators of both early and advanced stages of the disease -- and why they often go overlooked.
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