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Gastrointestinal Bleeding - HalfLytely Colon Preparation

This page contains links to eMedTV Digestive System Articles containing information on subjects from Gastrointestinal Bleeding to HalfLytely Colon Preparation. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • General Anesthesia for Liver Donation Surgery
    This video discusses the general anesthesia that will be used during the liver transplant surgery.
  • Generic Bumex
    As this eMedTV page explains, generic Bumex is available in tablet or injectable form (the latter is for hospital use only). This article lists the available strengths of the generic version and also lists some of the companies that manufacture it.
  • Generic Carafate
    There are generic Carafate (sucralfate) products available at this time. This eMedTV Web article takes an in-depth look at the generic version of this drug, including how the FDA has determined that the generic is equivalent to the brand-name medication.
  • Generic Colyte
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, colyte is sold in brand-name and generic form. This article discusses the generic version, explaining what an "AA" rating is, how a generic version can differ from the brand-name drug, and more.
  • Generic GoLYTELY
    This selection from the eMedTV archives explains that generic GoLYTELY (polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution) is currently available. This page also covers how the FDA compares the generic versions to brand-name GoLYTELY.
  • Generic HalfLytely and Bisacodyl
    This eMedTV segment discusses why there are currently no generic HalfLytely and Bisacodyl (polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution and bisacodyl) products available. This article also explains when a generic version of the product might become available.
  • Generic MiraLAX
    As this eMedTV page explains, MiraLAX (polyethylene glycol 3350) is available as a generic medication. This page explains how the generic versions compare to the brand-name drug and discusses how to choose a reliable manufacturer.
  • Generic MoviPrep
    As this eMedTV Web resource discusses, there are currently no generic MoviPrep products available. This page explains when a generic might become available and describes the difference between a "generic name" and a "generic version" of a drug.
  • Generic NuLYTELY
    This eMedTV Web selection offers an overview of generic NuLYTELY, including details on how it compares to the brand-name version of the drug and what the medicine is used for. An explanation of how the FDA rates generic medicines is also provided.
  • Generic Prepopik
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is not legal for companies to make generic Prepopik (sodium picosulfate/magnesium oxide/anhydrous citric acid), as the drug is protected by exclusivity rights. This article explains when a generic might become available.
  • Generic Ranitidine
    Generic ranitidine is available in over-the-counter and prescription strengths. This eMedTV Web page discusses which forms of ranitidine are available as generics and explains that generic forms of Zantac EFFERdose tablets and syrup are not available.
  • Generic Rectiv
    This eMedTV page explains why there are currently no generic versions of Rectiv (nitroglycerin anal ointment) and when this situation may change. This article also discusses why compounded versions of Nitro-Bid are not the same thing as generic Rectiv.
  • Generic RotaTeq
    At this time, there are no generic versions of RotaTeq available in the United States. This article from the eMedTV archives explains why the RotaTeq vaccine and other "biologic" medications are not available in generic form.
  • Generic Tegaserod
    This eMedTV page warns against buying any of the fake, substandard, and potentially dangerous drugs currently sold as "generic tegaserod." An approved generic for tegaserod won't be available until at least 2013, when the patent for tegaserod expires.
  • Generic TriLyte
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV library, TriLyte is a generic version of another laxative medication. This article gives the name of the brand-name drug and explains how TriLyte compares to the brand-name version.
  • Generic Viokace
    No generic Viokace products are available, as the drug is protected by certain exclusivity rights. This eMedTV Web page offers a discussion on when these rights are expected to expire and when a generic version of the drug might become available.
  • Generic Zegerid OTC
    There are no generic Zegerid OTC products available at this time. This eMedTV segment discusses when a generic version of this medication might become available and describes the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Getting Started (Colonoscopy)
    This multimedia clip explains what will happen as you are prepared for surgery.
  • Getting Started (Upper Endoscopy)
    This multimedia clip explains what will happen as you are prepared for surgery.
  • Getting Started With Your ERCP
    This video discusses what will happen on the day of your GI procedure.
  • Getting Started With Your ERCP With Sphincterotomy
    This video discusses what will happen on the day of your GI procedure.
  • Golitely
    GoLYTELY is a laxative that many people take before a colonoscopy or barium enema x-ray. This eMedTV Web resource takes a quick look at this prescription product and provides a link to more details on it. Golitely is a common misspelling of GoLYTELY.
  • Golitly
    Typically, preparing for a colonoscopy will involve taking a laxative such as GoLYTELY. This eMedTV resource tells you what you need to know about this product and provides a link to more information. Golitly is a common misspelling of GoLYTELY.
  • Golyte
    As this eMedTV page explains, GoLYTELY is an osmotic laxative used before colonoscopies and certain other procedures. This article describes the medication and lists some of its potential side effects. Golyte is a common misspelling of GoLYTELY.
  • GoLYTELY
    GoLYTELY is a laxative used to empty the bowels before certain gastrointestinal exams. This eMedTV article offers a comprehensive overview of this product, explaining the best way to take it, how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • GoLYTELY and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV selection talks about the issues surrounding breastfeeding and GoLYTELY. This article explains whether the drug is likely to pass through breast milk and tells you why it's important to consult your healthcare provider.
  • GoLYTELY and Pregnancy
    It is unknown if GoLYTELY (polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution) is completely safe during pregnancy. As this eMedTV page explains, however, problems seem unlikely, as the medication is not expected to be absorbed into the blood.
  • Golytely Bowel Prep
    This video segment discusses Golytely -- a common prescription medicine that is given prior to this procedure.
  • Golytely Bowel Prep -- Summary
    This video explains the importance of doing your bowel prep before your colonoscopy.
  • GoLYTELY Colonoscopy Preparation
    Being prepared for a colonoscopy involves emptying the bowels beforehand. As this eMedTV segment explains, GoLYTELY is a laxative commonly used for colonoscopy preparation. This article explains how it is used and provides a link to more information.
  • GoLYTELY Dosage
    This part of the eMedTV Web site offers several tips and dosing guidelines on how GoLYTELY should be taken. This includes how much needs to be consumed, how long it usually takes for the laxative to start working, and more.
  • GoLYTELY Drug Interactions
    If you are taking GoLYTELY, other medications should be avoided in the hour before starting this laxative. This eMedTV resource gives an overview of interactions between GoLYTELY and other drugs, explaining how you can reduce your risk of problems.
  • GoLYTELY Instructions
    This selection from the eMedTV archives talks about when and how GoLYTELY should be taken. It provides instructions on how to take GoLYTELY the right way and provides a link to more detailed information on the topic.
  • GoLYTELY Laxative
    This eMedTV page deals with GoLYTELY, a laxative that is available only by prescription. This article lists a few side effects and talks about the medication's available forms and strengths. A link to more information is also included.
  • GoLYTELY Medication Information
    GoLYTELY is taken in order to cleanse the bowels before a colonoscopy or certain other procedures. This eMedTV segment offers more information on GoLYTELY, including basic dosing guidelines for the medication, side effects, and warnings.
  • GoLYTELY Overdose
    If you drink too much GoLYTELY, symptoms may include nausea and vomiting. This eMedTV Web page lists other likely symptoms of an overdose with this laxative and explains what treatment options are available if a person overdoses on GoLYTELY.
  • GoLYTELY Pineapple
    There are three GoLYTELY products available, one of which contains a pineapple flavor packet. This eMedTV Web page talks about how to prepare GoLYTELY in preparation for your procedure. A link to more information is also included.
  • GoLYTELY Prescribing Information
    This eMedTV segment offers basic prescribing information for GoLYTELY, a laxative used to empty the bowels before colonoscopies and other procedures. This article explains when and how to use it, and also provides a link to more dosing information.
  • GoLYTELY Side Effects
    Nausea and stomach bloating are among the common side effects of GoLYTELY. This eMedTV page also lists less common side effects, as well as serious problems you should report to your healthcare provider, such as sudden shortness of breath.
  • GoLYTELY Solution
    As this eMedTV segment explains, your healthcare provider may recommend drinking GoLYTELY solution the night before your colonoscopy. This article gives some basic dosing guidelines for this laxative and includes a link to more information.
  • GoLYTELY Uses
    As this eMedTV segment explains, GoLYTELY is used to cleanse the bowels in preparation for a colonoscopy or barium enema exam. This article discusses how the laxative works and explains why it is important to empty the bowel before these procedures.
  • GoLYTELY Warnings and Precautions
    People with a hole or blockage in the intestines should not use GoLYTELY. This eMedTV article outlines important warnings and precautions with GoLYTELY, including what your doctor needs to know and what to expect while taking it.
  • Golytle
    As explained in this section of the eMedTV site, GoLYTELY helps empty the bowels in preparation for exams such as colonoscopies. This article takes a quick look at this prescription laxative. Golytle is a common misspelling of GoLYTELY.
  • Golytly
    Available by prescription, GoLYTELY is used to empty the bowels before certain gastrointestinal procedures. This eMedTV article gives a brief overview of the laxative, including potential side effects. Golytly is a common misspelling of GoLYTELY.
  • Halflitely
    HalfLytely and Bisacodyl is a medicine licensed to cleanse the bowels before a colonoscopy. This eMedTV page describes how this product works and explains some general dosing tips for using this drug. Halflitely is a common misspelling of HalfLytely.
  • Halflyte
    HalfLytely and Bisacodyl is a prescribed laxative used to empty the bowels before a colonoscopy. This eMedTV selection covers how this laxative works, when it is taken, and general safety concerns. Halflyte is a common misspelling of HalfLytely.
  • HalfLytely and Bisacodyl
    If you have an upcoming colonoscopy, your healthcare provider may prescribe HalfLytely and Bisacodyl. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at this bowel-prep product, including details on how it works, possible side effects, dosing tips, and more.
  • HalfLytely and Bisacodyl and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, it is unclear if it is safe to use HalfLytely and Bisacodyl (polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution) while breastfeeding. This article further discusses this topic and explains why problems are unlikely.
  • HalfLytely and Bisacodyl and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV resource explains, it is not known if it is safe for pregnant women to use HalfLytely and Bisacodyl (polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution and bisacodyl). This page also discusses the manufacturer's recommendations on the topic.
  • HalfLytely and Bisacodyl Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the standard dose of HalfLytely and Bisacodyl is to take one bisacodyl tablet and drink two liters of the HalfLytely solution over a certain time period. This page also lists helpful dosing tips to ensure your safety.
  • HalfLytely and Bisacodyl Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV page explains that interactions may occur if certain drugs are taken with HalfLytely and Bisacodyl. This page takes an in-depth look at the products that may negatively interact with this laxative and describes the problems that may occur.
  • HalfLytely and Bisacodyl Medication Information
    HalfLytely and Bisacodyl is a laxative prescribed to empty the bowels in preparation for a colonoscopy. This eMedTV Web page provides important information on HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, including dosing tips and an explanation of how the medication works.
  • HalfLytely and Bisacodyl Overdose
    As this eMedTV resource explains, nausea and vomiting may occur if you overdose on HalfLytely and Bisacodyl (polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution). This page outlines other possible symptoms and describes treatment options that are available.
  • HalfLytely and Bisacodyl Side Effects
    Nausea, vomiting, and cramping are some common side effects of HalfLytely and Bisacodyl. This eMedTV resource provides a more detailed list of problems you may experience with this laxative, with information on when to seek medical care.
  • HalfLytely and Bisacodyl Uses
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV Web site, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl is used for emptying the bowels before a colonoscopy. This article takes a in-depth look at how this prescription laxative works and describes possible off-label (unapproved) uses.
  • HalfLytely and Bisacodyl Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use HalfLytely and Bisacodyl if you have heart problems or an intestinal blockage. This eMedTV article highlights other important warnings and precautions to be aware of before using HalfLytely and Bisacodyl.
  • HalfLytely Bowel Prep
    As this eMedTV page discusses, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl works to prep the bowel for a colonoscopy by causing frequent bowel movements. This page covers how this drug works and explains why it is important for your bowels to be empty before this procedure.
  • HalfLytely Bowel Prep Kit
    HalfLytely and Bisacodyl is used before a colonoscopy to help prep the bowel. The HalfLytely kit, as this eMedTV Web article explains, works to empty the bowels so your healthcare provider can look for possible problems within the colon.
  • HalfLytely Braintree
    Manufactured by Braintree Laboratories, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl is a laxative used prior to a colonoscopy. This eMedTV Web article provides a brief overview of this prescription product, with information on when and how to use it.
  • HalfLytely Colon Preparation
    This eMedTV segment talks about preparing HalfLytely and Bisacodyl before your colonoscopy. It covers how this laxative works and explains when and how to take it. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
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