Digestive System Channel
Topics
Medications
Quicklinks
Related Channels

Digestive System Articles A-Z

Minor Complications -- ERCP With Sphincterotomy - Orally Disintegrating Metoclopramide Dosage

This page contains links to eMedTV Digestive System Articles containing information on subjects from Minor Complications -- ERCP With Sphincterotomy to Orally Disintegrating Metoclopramide Dosage. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Minor Complications -- ERCP With Sphincterotomy
    This multimedia clip introduces minor complications.
  • Minor Liver Donor Surgery Problems
    Minor problems can occur with this procedure, which this interactive media clip addresses.
  • Minor Problems With Liver Donation Surgery
    Minor problems can occur with this procedure, which this interactive media clip addresses.
  • MiraLAX
    If you have occasional constipation, you may benefit from MiraLAX. This page of the eMedTV Web site takes an in-depth look at this over-the-counter laxative, including details on how it works, possible side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • MiraLAX 17 Grams Daily
    When using MiraLAX, 17 grams of the powder are dissolved in liquid and swallowed to treat constipation. This eMedTV page further discusses some general dosing guidelines for when and how to take this laxative, with a link to more information.
  • MiraLAX 238 gram
    The 238-gram MiraLAX multidose bottle contains 14 doses of this laxative. This eMedTV selection discusses various other dosing amounts that are available and gives a brief description of general dosing guidelines. A link to more details is also included.
  • MiraLAX and Breastfeeding
    It is not known if it is safe to use MiraLAX (polyethylene glycol 3350) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV article explains how no research has been done on the possible risks of taking this laxative while nursing and discusses why problems are unlikely.
  • MiraLAX and Pregnancy
    It is not known whether it is safe to use MiraLAX (polyethylene glycol 3350) during pregnancy. This eMedTV page further discusses this topic, including details on why a pregnant woman should only take this laxative when the benefits outweigh the risks.
  • MiraLAX Dosage
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, the standard MiraLAX dose is 17 grams of the powder dissolved in a beverage and swallowed once daily. This article also provides important dosing instructions on how to safely and effectively use this laxative.
  • MiraLAX Drug Class
    As this eMedTV article explains, MiraLAX belongs to a class of drugs called osmotic laxatives and works by drawing water into the colon. This Web page further discusses how this laxative works and describes possible side effects that may occur.
  • MiraLAX Drug Interactions
    There are no known MiraLAX drug interactions. As this eMedTV Web selection explains, however, it is possible that certain interactions haven't been discovered yet, so tell your doctor about all medications you are taking before using this laxative.
  • MiraLAX for Children
    Before using MiraLAX in children, make sure to check with your child's doctor. This eMedTV article explains that using this laxative in children is considered an "off-label," or unapproved, use of the drug. This page also describes how it works.
  • MiraLAX for Constipation
    If you have occasional constipation, MiraLAX may help relieve your symptoms. This eMedTV segment offers a brief overview of using this laxative for constipation relief, with details on how the drug works. A link to more information is also included.
  • MiraLAX Ingredients
    There is only one ingredient in MiraLAX -- the active ingredient called polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG-3350). This eMedTV resource explains that this laxative does not contain any inactive ingredients and links to more detailed information.
  • MiraLAX Laxative
    Available without a prescription, MiraLAX is a laxative used to treat occasional constipation. This eMedTV article takes a brief look at how this medication works, how to take it, and when it starts to work. A link to more details is also provided.
  • MiraLAX Medication Information
    MiraLAX is a nonprescription laxative used to treat occasional constipation. This eMedTV Web selection provides important information on MiraLAX, including how this medication works, dosing tips, and what you need to know before taking it.
  • MiraLAX Over-the-Counter
    This eMedTV page explains that you do not need a prescription to get MiraLAX, as this laxative is available without a prescription (over-the-counter). This segment also explains how this laxative works to treat constipation.
  • MiraLAX Overdose
    Dehydration due to diarrhea may occur if you overdose on MiraLAX (polyethylene glycol 3350). This eMedTV resource outlines other symptoms a person might experience after taking too much of this laxative, as well as treatment options that are available.
  • MiraLAX Packets
    If you have occasional constipation, you may benefit from using MiraLAX packets. This page from the eMedTV Web library explains when and how to effectively use these packets. This page also offers a link to more detailed information on this laxative.
  • MiraLAX Powder
    Before consuming MiraLAX, the powder should be dissolved in a beverage, such as water or juice. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief look at how to take this laxative and how this medicine works. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • MiraLAX Side Affects
    While most people do not have problems with MiraLAX, side effects are possible. This eMedTV page describes some of these possible side effects, including potentially serious problems. MiraLAX side affects is a common misspelling of MiraLAX side effects.
  • MiraLAX Side Effects
    Diarrhea, nausea, and gas are some of the more common MiraLAX side effects. This eMedTV Web resource provides a more detailed list of problems you may experience during treatment with this laxative, with information on when to seek medical care.
  • MiraLAX Uses
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, MiraLAX is used for relieving occasional constipation. This article takes a closer look at what the laxative is used for, including possible off-label uses. A description of how MiraLAX works is also provided.
  • MiraLAX Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use MiraLAX if you have certain allergies or an intestinal blockage. This eMedTV article highlights other important MiraLAX warnings and precautions to be aware of before using this laxative, including what to tell your doctor.
  • Mirelax
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, MiraLAX is used to treat occasional constipation. This article discusses how this nonprescription laxative works and describes some general safety concerns. Mirelax is a common misspelling of MiraLAX.
  • Mirlax
    Available without a prescription, MiraLAX is a medicine licensed to treat occasional constipation. This eMedTV Web page describes how this laxative is taken and why it may not be suitable for some people. Mirlax is a common misspelling of MiraLAX.
  • Mirulax
    MiraLAX is a nonprescription laxative used to treat occasional constipation. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at this drug, including how it works and general dosing guidelines for taking this laxative. Mirulax is a common misspelling of MiraLAX.
  • Misoprostal
    As this eMedTV segment explains, people who are taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and are at risk for stomach ulcers may benefit from misoprostol. This page covers dosing tips and side effects. Misoprostal is a common misspelling of misoprostol.
  • Misoprostil
    As this eMedTV segment explains, misoprostol is prescribed for preventing certain types of ulcers in people taking NSAIDs. This page covers how this drug works and what to discuss with your doctor. Misoprostil is a common misspelling of misoprostol.
  • Misoprostol
    Misoprostol tablets contain a hormone-like substance that prevents stomach ulcers in people taking NSAIDs. This eMedTV resource features more information on this prescription drug, including who may benefit from it, dosing tips, and side effects.
  • Misoprostol 200 Mcg
    For preventing ulcers, the usual dose of misoprostol is 200 mcg taken four times daily. As this eMedTV Web selection explains, you may need a lower dosage if you develop intolerable side effects. A link to more information is also included.
  • Misoprostol and Pregnancy
    Taking misoprostol during pregnancy can cause potentially dangerous complications in the mother and baby. This eMedTV Web page describes the problems that may occur and stresses the importance of avoiding this drug while pregnant.
  • Misoprostol and Tinnitus
    It is possible to develop ringing in the ears (tinnitus) while using misoprostol. However, as this eMedTV segment explains, this is a rare reaction to the medication. This article also provides a link to other possible side effects of misoprostol.
  • Misoprostol Dosage
    This eMedTV Web selection examines how your doctor will determine an appropriate misoprostol dosage. This article also offers suggestions on when and how to take this medication to help minimize possible side effects like diarrhea.
  • Misoprostol Drug Information
    Adults who take certain pain relievers and have an increased risk for ulcers may benefit from misoprostol. This eMedTV page contains more information on misoprostol, including how the drug works to prevent stomach ulcers, dosing tips, and safety issues.
  • Misoprostol Induction of Labor
    Using misoprostol for the induction of labor is considered an "off-label," or unapproved, use for the drug. This eMedTV resource explains when a doctor may recommend this use of the drug and describes some possible complications that can occur.
  • Misoprostol Intravaginally
    When given intravaginally, misoprostol can be used to help induce labor or cause an abortion. However, as this eMedTV segment explains, these are "off-label" (unapproved) uses for the drug. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Misoprostol Side Effects
    As this eMedTV page explains, people who took misoprostol during clinical trials reported that diarrhea, headaches, and nausea were common problems. Other misoprostol side effects are outlined in this article, including those that require treatment.
  • Misoprostol Tablets
    If you are taking certain pain relievers and are at risk for ulcers, your doctor may prescribe misoprostol. This eMedTV Web selection covers some dosing instructions for when and how to take misoprostol tablets, with a link to more detailed information.
  • Motivación y Seguridad
    Motivación y Seguridad
  • Motivation and Reassurance (Following Liver Donation)
    This clip explains that the recipient's health may not improve after the transplant, and that this is not your fault.
  • Moveeprep
    MoviPrep is a medicine licensed to cleanse the bowels before a colonoscopy. This eMedTV page describes how MoviPrep works and explains some general dosing guidelines for when and how to use this drug. Moveeprep is a common misspelling of MoviPrep.
  • Moveprep
    MoviPrep is a prescription laxative used to empty the bowels before a colonoscopy. This page of the eMedTV Web site also explains how this laxative works, when it is taken, and potential side effects. Moveprep is a common misspelling of MoviPrep.
  • Movieprep
    MoviPrep is a medicine that is commonly used to empty the bowels before a colonoscopy. This eMedTV page also explains how this prescription laxative works, when it is taken, and general safety concerns. Movieprep is a common misspelling of MoviPrep.
  • Moving to the Procedure Room (Liver Donation Surgery)
    There are some typical things you can expect in the procedure room prior to your surgery, which this clip explains.
  • Moving to the Recovery Room After Colonoscopy
    This video clip explains what will happen immediately following your colonoscopy.
  • Moving to the Recovery Room After ERCP
    This video explains what will happen after your ERCP.
  • Moving to the Recovery Room After ERCP With Sphincterotomy
    This video explains what will happen after your ERCP.
  • Moving to the Recovery Room After Upper Endoscopy
    This video describes what to expect in the recovery room after an EGD.
  • MoviPrep
    Available by prescription only, MoviPrep is a laxative approved to cleanse the bowels before a colonoscopy. This eMedTV page further describes this prescription drug, with details on how it works, when and how to take it, safety precautions, and more.
  • MoviPrep and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV article discusses, it is unknown if MoviPrep passes through breast milk. This article explains how no research has been done on the possible risks of breastfeeding while using MoviPrep, and why it's unlikely that it would cause problems.
  • MoviPrep and Nausea
    As this eMedTV page explains, nausea is a common side effect of MoviPrep. This article contains more information on this topic, including how often this reaction occurs and when to contact your healthcare provider. A link to more details is also included.
  • MoviPrep and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to use MoviPrep if you are expecting. This selection from the eMedTV Web site further discusses this topic, including the manufacturer's recommendations and details on why the FDA classifies MoviPrep as a pregnancy Category C drug.
  • MoviPrep Colonoscopy Prep
    A healthcare provider may prescribe MoviPrep before a colonoscopy to prep the bowel. MoviPrep, as this eMedTV Web article explains, causes watery bowel movements to clean out the colon so your doctor can look for possible problems.
  • MoviPrep Complications
    If you have inflammatory bowel disease or electrolyte problems, you may not be able to take MoviPrep. This eMedTV page describes potential complications with MoviPrep, such as seizures and drug interactions. A link to more details is also provided.
  • MoviPrep Dosage
    This eMedTV article explains that although there is only one standard MoviPrep dosage, it may be taken as either a split-dose or an evening-only, full-dose amount. This page also lists some helpful tips on when and how to use this laxative.
  • MoviPrep Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV page explains that interactions may occur if certain drugs are taken with MoviPrep. This article describes some of the complications that may occur and explains why some medications may need to be stopped days prior to using MoviPrep.
  • MoviPrep Medication Information
    As a laxative, MoviPrep is prescribed to empty the bowels before a colonoscopy. This selection from the eMedTV Web site offers more information on this medication, including how to use MoviPrep, possible side effects, and general safety precautions.
  • MoviPrep Overdose
    Dehydration, severe diarrhea, and electrolyte problems are possible effects of an overdose with MoviPrep. This eMedTV segment lists other symptoms a person might experience after taking too much of this laxative, as well as treatment options.
  • MoviPrep Powder
    If you are scheduled to have a colonoscopy, MoviPrep may be prescribed to empty the bowels. This eMedTV page describes how to prepare MoviPrep powder for drinking and offers tips on how to take this laxative. A link to more information is also provided.
  • MoviPrep Prescription Instructions
    The dose of MoviPrep for emptying the bowels is two liters of the solution and one liter of clear liquids. This eMedTV article gives instructions for how to prepare this prescription laxative and provides a link to more information on MoviPrep.
  • MoviPrep Side Effects
    Swelling of the stomach and anal irritation are among the possible side effects of MoviPrep. As this eMedTV page explains, there are also more serious problems that may occur, such as vomiting bright-red blood, which require immediate medical attention.
  • MoviPrep Uses
    MoviPrep is prescribed to help empty the bowels before a colonoscopy procedure. This page from the eMedTV Web site discusses how this laxative works, whether it is safe for children, and possible off-label (unapproved) uses of MoviPrep.
  • MoviPrep Warnings and Precautions
    If you have an electrolyte imbalance or a bowel obstruction, you may not be able to take MoviPrep. This eMedTV page lists other precautions to be aware of with MoviPrep, including warnings for possible drug interactions and other potential complications.
  • MRI - Liver
    This video describes the process of having an MRI done on your liver.
  • MRI for Liver Donation
    Doctors may take an MRI for the liver donation evaluation to make sure your liver is in good condition. This eMedTV article describes how an MRI works, what to expect, and the information that is obtained from the images.
  • Murilax
    Available without a prescription, MiraLAX is typically taken once a day to treat constipation. This eMedTV page describes why this laxative may not be suitable for some people and lists possible side effects. Murilax is a common misspelling of MiraLAX.
  • Nasogastric GoLYTELY
    As this eMedTV article explains, GoLYTELY solution can be given through a nasogastric tube if necessary. This resource talks about how the laxative is typically taken and offers some safety concerns to keep in mind if taking it through a nasogastric tube.
  • Newlytely
    NuLYTELY is a medicine licensed to cleanse the bowels before a colonoscopy. This eMedTV page describes how NuLYTELY works and explains some general dosing guidelines for when and how to use this drug. Newlytely is a common misspelling of NuLYTELY.
  • Normal Liver Anatomy
    Because the liver does so many important things for your body, you can't live without one. This video clip offers an overview of what your liver does.
  • NuLYTELY
    Available by prescription only, NuLYTELY is a laxative prescribed to cleanse the bowels before a colonoscopy. This eMedTV page further describes this drug, with information on how it works, when and how to take it, safety precautions, and more.
  • NuLYTELY and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV segment discusses, it is unknown if NuLYTELY passes through breast milk. This article explains how no research has been done on the possible risks of breastfeeding and using NuLYTELY, and why it's unlikely that it would cause problems.
  • NuLYTELY and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to use NuLYTELY during pregnancy. This page from the eMedTV site further discusses this topic, including information on why the FDA classifies NuLYTELY as a pregnancy Category C drug, and also gives the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • NuLYTELY Bowel Prep
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, NuLYTELY works to prep the bowel for a colonoscopy by causing frequent bowel movements. This page describes how this drug works and explains why it is important for your bowels to be empty before this procedure.
  • NuLYTELY Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV Web resource discusses whether it is safe to take NuLYTELY while breastfeeding. This page explains how it is not known whether this prescription laxative passes through breast milk and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • NuLYTELY Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, the recommended NuLYTELY dosage for adults is eight ounces of the solution consumed every 10 minutes until you have clear, watery bowel movements. This page offers some helpful tips on when and how to use this laxative.
  • NuLYTELY Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV page explains that interactions may occur if certain oral drugs are taken within one hour of the first NuLYTELY dose. This article discusses why some medications may need to be stopped days or a week prior to using NuLYTELY.
  • NuLYTELY Info
    This eMedTV Web resource provides some basic information on NuLYTELY, a laxative that is available only by prescription. This article explains how this medicine works to cleanse the bowel and why it may not be the best choice for everyone.
  • NuLYTELY Medication Information
    NuLYTELY is a laxative prescribed to empty the bowels in preparation for a colonoscopy. This eMedTV Web selection provides important information on NuLYTELY, including how this medication works, dosing tips, and possible side effects.
  • NuLYTELY Overdose
    Vomiting, dehydration, and feelings of fullness are possible signs of a NuLYTELY overdose. This eMedTV resource outlines other symptoms a person might experience after taking too much of this laxative, as well as treatment options that are available.
  • NuLYTELY Pharmacology
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web site explains, NuLYTELY works by drawing water into the colon to cause watery bowel movements. This article offers important information on NuLYTELY's pharmacology, including a link to more details on this laxative.
  • NuLYTELY Prep for Colonoscopy
    A healthcare provider may prescribe NuLYTELY before a colonoscopy to help prep the bowel. NuLYTELY, as this eMedTV Web article explains, empties the bowels within about four hours so your doctor can look for possible problems within the colon.
  • NuLYTELY Side Effects
    Nausea and feeling bloated are among the possible side effects of NuLYTELY. As this eMedTV page discusses, there are also more serious problems that may occur, such as rectal bleeding and difficulty breathing. This page explains when to seek medical care.
  • NuLYTELY Uses
    NuLYTELY is approved for emptying the bowels before a colonoscopy procedure. This eMedTV Web resource further discusses how this prescription laxative works, whether it is safe for children, and possible off-label (unapproved) uses of NuLYTELY.
  • NuLYTELY Warnings and Precautions
    If you have toxic colitis or toxic megacolon, you should not take NuLYTELY. This eMedTV page offers other precautions to be aware of before taking NuLYTELY, including warnings for possible drug interactions and other potential complications.
  • Nulytle
    NuLYTELY is a prescribed laxative used to empty the bowels before a colonoscopy. This page of the eMedTV Web site also explains how this laxative works, when it is taken, and potential side effects. Nulytle is a common misspelling of NuLYTELY.
  • Obstrucción Intestinal
    Obstrucción Intestinal
  • Olsalazine
    Olsalazine is prescribed to prevent ulcerative colitis symptoms in people for whom it is in remission. This eMedTV article presents an in-depth look at the drug, including how it works, possible side effects, and helpful tips for people taking it.
  • Olsalazine Dosing
    This eMedTV article explains that the typical olsalazine dosage given to adults with ulcerative colitis is two 250 mg capsules, taken twice daily. This page also lists factors that can affect olsalazine dosing (such as other drugs you're taking).
  • Olsalazine Sodium
    A prescription drug, olsalazine sodium is used to help keep ulcerative colitis symptoms from returning. This eMedTV segment features a brief description of this product, including who can use it, what to expect, and how to take it.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.